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LMC Receives Grant for Breast Cancer Screenings

Lexington Medical Center has received a grant from the SC Mountains to Midlands Affiliate of the Susan G. Komen For the Cure Foundation to provide breast cancer screenings for uninsured and underinsured women in the Midlands. Lexington Medical Center is the only hospital in the Midlands to receive the grant this year, and one of only four in South Carolina.

Lexington Medical Center applied for the grant to help women in need in our community. Mammograms can help to detect breast cancer in its earliest stages. Clinicians know that early detection is key to successful treatment of breast cancer. Many times, women without insurance or financial resources don’t have a routine screening mammogram.

L to R: LMC VP of Community Relations Barbara Willm; Stephanie Miller and Emily Bugay of the Susan G. Komen Foundation; LMC Board Chair Jan Burt; LMC President & CEO Mike Biediger

L to R: LMC VP of Community Relations Barbara Willm; Stephanie Miller and Emily Bugay of the Susan G. Komen Foundation; LMC Board Chair Jan Burt; LMC President & CEO Mike Biediger

“Lexington Medical Center works with local partners to find ways to help provide screenings where they are most needed,” said Barbara Willm, vice president of Community Relations at Lexington Medical Center. “Recently, that’s included outreach into the Korean and Hispanic communities, including a health fair at a Hispanic grocery store with Lexington Medical Center’s mobile mammography van.”

In addition, the Susan G. Komen Foundation honored Lexington Medical Center and breast cancer nurse navigator Kelly Jeffcoat as “Komen Champions.” In its inaugural year, the “Komen Champion” award celebrates an organization or person that shares the Susan G. Komen Foundation’s mission to create a world without breast cancer.

L to R: LMC VP of Community Relations Barbara Willm; Stephanie Miller and Emily Bugay of the Susan G. Komen Foundation; Kelly Jeffcoat; LMC Board Chair Jan Burt; LMC President & CEO Mike Biediger

L to R: LMC VP of Community Relations Barbara Willm; Stephanie Miller and Emily Bugay of the Susan G. Komen Foundation; Kelly Jeffcoat; LMC Board Chair Jan Burt; LMC President & CEO Mike Biediger

As a breast cancer nurse navigator at Lexington Medical Center, Kelly Jeffcoat helps newly diagnosed women work their way through treatment, providing helpful information and emotional support along the way. Kelly is a breast cancer survivor herself, diagnosed at the young age of 37. Kelly also leads support groups for women with breast cancer at the hospital and in the community.

Kelly Jeffcoat participates in TV news interviews

Kelly Jeffcoat participates in TV news interviews

Lexington Medical Center diagnoses approximately 250 breast cancer patients each year. The hospital’s breast program is accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) and the American College of Radiology (ACR). Lexington Medical Center has four Women’s Imaging centers and a mobile mammography van, all offering digital mammography. During treatment, breast cancer patients receive the assistance of a nurse navigator who provides education and emotional support. Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program is also accredited with commendation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.

This is the fourth time that this affiliate of the Susan G. Komen Foundation has awarded Lexington Medical Center a grant for breast cancer screenings.

LMC Welcomes C. Philip Toussaint, MD, FAANS

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to welcome C. Philip Toussaint, MD, FAANS to the hospital’s network of care. Dr. Toussaint will practice at the newly created Lexington Brain and Spine Institute on the hospital campus in West Columbia.

Dr. C. Philip Toussaint

Dr. C. Philip Toussaint

Prior to joining Lexington Medical Center, Dr. Toussaint served as an assistant professor of clinical surgery at the University of South Carolina’s Division of Neurosurgery. He joins Lexington Brain and Spine Institute to provide comprehensive care for disorders of the brain, spinal cord, and central and peripheral nervous systems.

Dr. Toussaint graduated magna cum laude from the College of Charleston and earned his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He went on to complete his surgical internship and neurosurgical residency at Loyola University Medical Center’s Stritch School of Medicine in Maywood, Ill., and completed a peripheral nerve surgical fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

A United States Army Reserve major, Dr. Toussaint is a diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgeons and a member of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the South Carolina Association of Neurological Surgeons.

Dr. Toussaint is accepting new patients.

Lexington Brain and Spine Institute
146 North Hospital Drive, Suite 350
West Columbia, SC 29169
(803) 935 – 8410

LexingtonBrainandSpine.com

The Most Experienced TAVR Facility in the Midlands

Reaching a significant milestone in comprehensive cardiovascular care for the people of our community, Lexington Medical Center has become the most experienced hospital in the Midlands for transcatheter aortic valve replacement, known as TAVR. The procedure allows doctors to replace the heart’s aortic valve with a catheter instead of open heart surgery.

Lexington Medical Center is celebrating the one-year anniversary of beginning its TAVR program. So far, the hospital has performed more than 60 TAVR procedures, more than any other hospital in the Midlands. TAVR is considered the greatest advance in cardiology since coronary angioplasty.

Currently, TAVR is for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are high-risk candidates for open heart surgery because of their age, history of heart disease, or other health issues.

Lexington Medical Center's TAVR Team. L to R: Jeffrey Travis, MD; Robert Malanuk, MD, FACC; Kristen Davis, MSN, RN, CCRN; Robert Leonardi, MD, FACC; Dee Prastein, MD

Lexington Medical Center’s TAVR Team. L to R: Jeffrey Travis, MD; Robert Malanuk, MD, FACC; Kristen Davis, MSN, RN, CCRN; Robert Leonardi, MD, FACC; Dee Prastein, MD

“We feel so lucky to be able to help these people, many of whom are debilitated by heart failure and did not have any good options in the past,” said Dr. Robert Leonardi of Lexington Cardiology at Lexington Medical Center, who works with a team of clinicians on the hospital’s TAVR team.

Patients with severe aortic stenosis have a narrowed aortic valve that does not allow blood to flow efficiently. As the heart works harder to pump enough blood through the smaller opening in the valve, the heart eventually becomes weak. Over time, that can lead to life-threatening heart problems.


To replace the diseased aortic valve with TAVR, the new aortic valve is compressed into a catheter. Doctors thread the catheter through the body to the inside of the diseased aortic valve.

Then, they deploy the new valve inside the diseased aortic valve, which becomes the anchor for the new valve. The new valve is functional immediately and normal blood flow is restored.

Lexington Medical Center performed the first fully percutaneous TAVR procedure in South Carolina. With this minimally invasive technique, doctors deployed the new aortic valve through just a small puncture in the femoral artery in the leg. The hospital also performed the first TAVR procedure in South Carolina where the patient was awake, and it remains the only South Carolina hospital routinely doing the procedures fully percutaneously, without putting patients to sleep, and without the need for a transesophageal echocardiogram. This “minimalist” approach has been shown to make recovery from valve replacement easier.

Lexington Medical Center hosted a reception on the hospital campus in May with patients who underwent TAVR, clinicians and hospital employees.


To learn more about cardiovascular care at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/heart