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Welcome Heart Surgeon Deyanira “Dee” Prastein, MD

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to announce that Dr. Deyanira “Dee” Prastein has joined the hospital’s network of care as a heart surgeon. She joins Dr. Jeffrey Travis at Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, to provide comprehensive cardiovascular care that meets the needs of our community. She is the first female heart surgeon in the Midlands.

Prastein_Labcoat_Standing_ORDr. Prastein has world-class training in cardiothoracic surgery, studying inside some of the most prestigious heart programs in the world. Her intensive work includes experience with the most state-of-the-art procedures available today.

Prior to joining Lexington Medical Center, Dr. Prastein was the lead cardiothoracic surgeon at Duke Regional Hospital in Durham, N.C. A graduate of the Medical College of Virginia, Dr. Prastein completed a general surgery residency at the University of Maryland and cardiothoracic surgery training at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine.

During her residency, she participated in extensive research on heart failure. She then worked at Papworth Hospital in England, a facility famous for being one of the first in Europe to perform heart transplants.

Dr. Prastein compares open heart surgery to an orchestra playing music.

“All of the players in the operating room have different roles and everything has to come together,” she said. “It’s paced so that things happen at the right time and tempo. Everyone knows the steps and what time to do certain things, and the timing matters.”

Dr. "Dee" Prastein and Dr. Jeffrey Travis of Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery inside Lexington Medical Center's open heart surgery suite.

Dr. “Dee” Prastein and Dr. Jeffrey Travis of Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery inside Lexington Medical Center’s open heart surgery suite.

Dr. Prastein decided that she wanted to be a heart surgeon while in medical school.

“I thought that cardiothoracic surgery was the most amazing thing you could do as a surgeon and doctor,” she said. “Our brain makes us human and the person you are, but none of that matters if you don’t have a working heart.”

Lexington Medical Center’s heart program is affiliated with Duke Medicine. Dr. Prastein learned about the hospital while working there. And she was impressed.

“Lexington Medical Center is very passionate about and dedicated to making its heart program succeed.”

She also liked that Lexington Medical Center has made efforts to make sure they have the best cardiologists and surgeons available, and supporting staff to provide top-notch care.

“I love what Lexington Medical Center has created. My goal is to make the hospital’s heart program grow and thrive. There’s a lot of goodwill and passion for treating patients with heart disease, and I want to make sure I’m part of that success.”

She understands that heart surgery is a scary proposition for patients and their families. So, she works to put them at ease.

“Right before surgery, I talk to my patients, hold their hand, look into their eyes and tell them, ‘I’m going to take good care of you.’”

She knows that heart surgery will improve their quality of life and help them to live longer.

Working as a doctor has been a dream of Dr. Prastein since childhood. She was born in Nicaragua and lived there until she was 10, when war led her family to move.

“When we lived in Nicaragua and the war started, I wanted to help people,” she said. “In my eyes, there were only two people you could run to for help – priests and doctors.

Obviously, I couldn’t be a priest, so I wanted to be a doctor.”

Dr. Prastein settled in Fairfax, Virginia, outside of Washington, D.C., with her parents and brothers. Her mother and father, a civil engineer, sent her to college at George Mason University, where she graduated with a degree in chemistry.

There, she met her husband, Jonathan. They’ve been married for nearly 20 years and have a son named Jascha, who will be two years old in March. In her spare time, Dr. Prastein enjoys spending time with Jonathan and Jascha, and running. She has completed five marathons.

“I am proof that you can do anything with hard work. I am truly living the American dream.”

Take 5 for Heart Health: Call 9-1-1, Learn CPR

When someone is having a heart attack, clinicians say it’s best to Call 9-1-1 for an ambulance instead of driving the person to the hospital yourself. That’s because there are tools in the ambulance that can begin treatment before arrival at the hospital. While you’re waiting for the paramedics, you can perform CPR. In this “Take 5 for Heart Health” segment from WIS-TV, LMC ER nurse Shannon Turner talks about the important information an ambulance can transmit to the ER when a patient is on the way and clinical nursing supervisor Lindsey Sturkie demonstrates the proper way to perform CPR.

Here are a few notes from Shannon and Lindsey:

~Calling 9-1-1 brings the emergency providers to you. Paramedics can assess the patient, perform an EKG and start the treatment that the hospital will continue.

~Paramedics send EKG results from the ambulance to the ER and call in a radio report with patient symptoms and vital signs. Then, the ER can alert the catheterization lab and cardiologists about the patient’s upcoming arrival. With heart care, every minute counts. Time is muscle.

~To perform CPR, put one hand on the middle of the chest at the bottom of the rib bone. Place your other hand on top, linking your fingers. Press down hard – 2 inches – at a rate of 100 compressions per minute. A proper pace would be to the tune of the song “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees. Experts say that mouth-to-mouth resuscitation or checking the pulse are no longer required.

~CPR will help to open and close the heart valves and chambers until paramedics arrive.

If you would like to learn Citizen CPR, come to Lexington Medical Center’s FREE Heart Fair on Sunday, March 1 from Noon – 4:00 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton on Bush River Road. Learn more at LexMed.com/Take5.

Take_5_Calendar.pdf