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Treating Stroke

Dr. Christopher McCarty, radiologist with Lexington Radiology Associates at Lexington Medical Center, was a guest on WLTX this month to talk about stroke in South Carolina. In the segment below, he talks abut prevalence, signs, symptoms and treatment.

Here are some notes from the doctor:

~A stroke is a medical emergency marked by a sudden change in neurological function caused by the blockage of blood flow leading to the brain.

~Major risk factors include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes, smoking and an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation.

~South Carolina has a high rate of stroke. It’s the 4th leading cause of death in our state.

~Signs that someone is suffering a stroke include face asymmetry or drooping of the face, arm weakness or numbness and slurred speech. These symptoms require timely treatment in order to preserve brain function.

~Doctors can give a drug called TPA that is a clot busting medicine if timely treatment is received.

Oh, Baby! Understanding Sleep Schedules and Vaccines

Dr. Jeremy Crisp of Lexington Family Practice Northeast, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, was a guest on WLTX this week to talk about common questions parents have about their young children. During their morning newscast, he answered questions from news anchor Ashley Izbicki about several topics.

In this segment, he offers tips for establishing a sleep schedule with an infant.

In this segment, he talks about the importance of vaccines and they dangerous diseases they can prevent.

Think Fast: How to Help Someone Who is Choking

This week, WIS-TV interviewed Dr. Don Moore of Lexington Medical Center’s Urgent Care in Irmo about how to help someone who is choking. The segment is below. The information is very valuable in a situation where you have to think fast.

Here are some notes from the doctor:

~When someone is choking, they will not be able to talk.
~Ask the person to try to cough.
~If the person cannot cough, try an abdominal thrust. From behind, put a clenched first above the person’s belly button and place your other hand over it. Pull up as if you were trying to lift the person off the ground, which will create a pressure wave to hopefully expel the object.
~If that doesn’t work, try back blows. With the base of your hand, hit the person on the back between the shoulder blades.
~Alternate between abdominal thrusts and back blows until the object is out.
~If the person goes unconscious, call 911 and start CPR.
~Anyone who has had a choking episode should see a physician to make sure they’re OK.

~If you’re alone, try performing an abdominal thrust by yourself with the help of a chair or table.

~If you have a baby who is choking, tip the child over and perform softer back blows.