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Free Art Classes Help Cancer Patients

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to offer “Healing Icons,” a series of free art classes for community members who have cancer. The next classes at Lexington Medical Center will begin on Wednesday, September 10th and run through December 3rd on the Lexington Medical Center hospital campus. The classes are open to anyone who has been diagnosed with cancer, and in any stage of treatment, regardless of where they have received their treatment.
Healing Icons at LMC
During the classes, students create art including black and white pencil drawings, masks, paintings and more. The students are in all stages of treatment from the beginning of chemotherapy to grappling with a recurrence of cancer. Creativity can help stimulate and support health immune systems. It can also help patients express the range of emotions they often feel about a cancer diagnosis and how it will impact themselves and their family.

Columbia artist Heidi Darr-Hope leads the classes. Learn more about her at www.healingicons.org

“Once people can freely express the anger and anxiety, they lay them on the shoulders of their artwork and become lighter,” Darr-Hope said. “It seems simplistic, but there’s rich information under it.”

“Healing Icons” is a free class for cancer patients that’s paid for through the Lexington Medical Center Foundation. Each week, students meet in the Resource Room located inside Lexington Oncology on the hospital campus.

Here is the schedule for the upcoming classes:

Autumn Workshop: Understanding Uncertainty, Unity, Wholeness and Balance
Wednesday, September 10. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Mixed Media Mandalas for Releasing, Letting Go

Wednesday, September 17. 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Open Studio – Independent Workshop Time

Wednesday, September 24. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Mixed Media Mandalas for Harvesting Gratitude

Wednesday, October 1. 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Open Studio – Independent Workshop Time

Wednesday, October 8. 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Mixed Media Mandalas for Accepting Uncertainty

Winter Workshop: Coming Home to Ourselves, Exploring Bookmarking
Wednesday, November 5. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Creating a Visual Journal for Remembering

Wednesday, November 12. 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Open Studio – Independent Workshop Time

Wednesday, November 19. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Creating a Visual Journal for Letting Go

Wednesday, November 26. 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Open Studio – Independent Workshop Time

Wednesday, December 3. 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Creating a Visual Journal for Discovery

To register, email info@healingicons.org, or call Libby Daniels at 791-2289 or Jennifer Peagler at 791-2617. Register early as class size is limited.

Members of the community can support Healing Icons by making a contribution to the Lexington Medical Center Foundation at LMCFoundation.com or by calling (803) 791-2540. Additionally, some of the current artwork from Healing Icons students appears on note cards that are available through the Foundation.

Using Antibiotics Appropriately

With guest blogger Dr. Brandon Emery of Lexington Pediatric Practice, an LMC physician practice

Antibiotics are a great remedy for a number of childhood infections and illnesses. They’re one of the great advances in medicine, but it’s important to use them wisely. Taking antibiotics too frequently when they’re not absolutely necessary may decrease the effectiveness of antibiotics for your child in the long term.

Dr. Brandon Emery

Dr. Brandon Emery

Some illnesses always need antibiotics. Strep throat is one of them. However, sinus infections may be a different story. Some inus infections may resolve on their own without antibiotics.

One of the most common childhood illnesses is an ear infection. If a child with an ear infection is an infant, we usually treat them with antibiotics. For an older child, you may decide to simply treat the pain and allow the immune system a chance to resolve the infection on its own. Your doctor can help you make the right choice based on your child’s symptoms.

Importantly, antibiotics will only help a bacterial infection, not a virus. A virus will have to run its course until your child is better. In the meantime, talk to your doctor about ways to treat the symptoms and make your child more comfortable while they’re sick.

It’s important to note that any child with the following symptoms should see a health care provider:
~A fever that lasts longer than five days
~A fever of more than 103 degrees that lasts 2 to 3 days
~Cold symptoms that last for more than ten days or with severe onset

immunizationHere’s the bottom line: Parents should take their child to the doctor for an evaluation and a diagnosis, but not thinking that they definitely need an antibiotic. Some infections do not require it. The overuse of antibiotics increases the risk of bacteria becoming resistant to them. And because there are not a lot of new antibiotics being produced, that can impact your child’s ability to fight a more serious infection in the future.

Parents should always feel free to discuss the role of antibiotics and their use with their pediatrician.

For more information about Dr. Emery and Lexington Pediatric Practice, visit LexPediatricPractice.com or call them at (803) 359-8855. The practice is located at 811 W. Main Street, Suite 204, in Lexington. Dr. Emery is accepting new patients.

Understanding the Disease Behind the “Ice Bucket Challenge”

The “Ice Bucket Challenge” has become a phenomenon on social media. It raises money for ALS research. But what exactly is ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease? Dr. Donald Schmechel, LMC neurologist, was on WIS-TV this week to talk about it. Check out what he said in the video below.