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Speaking of Men’s Health

man at beachWhat do cardiology, internal medicine, oncology and orthopaedics have in common? They’re all specialties that will be represented at Lexington Medical Center’s June physician lecture, “Speaking of Men’s Health.” The free lecture will be held on Monday, June 23 at 6:00 p.m. inside the Lexington Medical Park 1 Auditorium on the hospital campus.

Four Lexington Medical Center physicians will speak on a panel during the lecture. They are David K. Lee, MD of Southeastern Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine, Bradley W. Word, MD of The Columbia Medical Group, James L. Wells III, MD of Lexington Oncology and William W. Brabham, MD of Lexington Cardiology. Each will speak about topics related to their specialties. The topics will include knee replacement, shoulder injuries, heart attacks, cardiac arrhythmias, vitamins, types of cancer, staying in shape as we age, and more. Then, members of the audience will have the opportunity to ask questions.

The event is free to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, call Lexington Medical Center Community Outreach at (803) 936-8850.

“Speaking of Men’s Health” is part of the hospital’s monthly lecture series featuring medical topics that are important to our community. For more information on Lexington Medical Center events, visit LexMed.com.

FREE Skin Cancer Screening June 27th

It’s the time of year when we’re spending a lot of time outdoors and in the sun. While the sun can be fun, it can also damage your skin and make you more vulnerable to developing skin cancer. In fact, the Southeastern region of the United States has some of the highest incidences of skin cancer in the nation. That’s why Lexington Medical Center is teaming up with Palmetto Dermatology to offer a FREE skin cancer screening on Friday, June 27, 2014.

The free skin cancer screening will take place from 9:00 a.m. – Noon on Friday, June 27 at 109 West Hospital Drive in West Columbia. That’s the Lexington Sleep Solutions building. To make an appointment, call Lexington Medical Center Community Outreach at (803) 936 – 8850 Monday through Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Capacity is limited. An appointment is necessary.

sunscreen“Lexington Medical Center and Palmetto Dermatology are joining together to provide this important service to our community with the hopes that we can reduce the rate of melanoma in Lexington County,” said Connie Watson, Lexington Medical Center Community Outreach Director.

Upon arriving at the appointment, patients will fill out a questionnaire related to family and medical history. Then, they’ll receive a full body skin cancer screening from a doctor or physician assistant that looks for any suspicious moles or nodules on the skin. If the clinician finds something that appears suspicious, they will refer the patient to a doctor’s office for further inspection. Participants will also receive educational information about skin cancer.

Studies show that in 2013, more than 75,000 Americans were diagnosed with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. More than 9,000 patients died. Approximately 86% of melanomas are attributed to ultraviolet radiation from the sun. Information from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) shows that about 1 in 5 people will develop skin cancer in his or her lifetime. And doctors at Lexington Medical Center have reported seeing an increase in skin cancer among young adults in their 20’s.

According to Dr. Jeff Smith of Palmetto Dermatology, melanoma can be a very dangerous disease. Although it only makes up 3% of skin cancers, it is responsible for 75% of skin cancer deaths. Other than breast cancer, it is the most common form of cancer for women under 40.

“Sun protection, prompt detection and aggressive management are keys to treating melanoma,” said Dr. Smith “It can also be difficult to see. Some melanomas start with something as small as a spot between your toes.”

Doctors emphasize the importance of monthly self skin exams and yearly dermatology checkups in an effort to achieve early detection. Moles with the following characteristics should prompt concern:

~Asymmetrical borders
~Dark colors or multi-colored
~Diameter larger than a pencil eraser
~Evolving

Once a diagnosis is made, doctors perform prompt and appropriate surgical intervention.
To avoid skin cancer, experts recommend that patients:
~Use sunscreen with at least SPF 15 year-round when outside to avoid sunburn.
~Avoid tanning beds.
~Seek shade. The sun’s rays are strongest between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

A Memorial Day Prayer

On this Memorial Day, the following is a prayer from Donna Peele, director of Pastoral Care at Lexington Medical Center. We thank our heroes for their service and sacrifice.

USA flags3Gracious, Sovereign God, Lord of all nations,

On this Memorial Day, we pause to reflect upon our blessings as a nation and the high cost of those blessings for many.

Thank you for the freedom we enjoy in this country, for opportunities to flourish, and for the security of our land.

Thank you for those who have served in the armed services of our country, risking their lives for our liberty.

Thank you for those who have given their lives in service to our country, sacrificing in such a costly way for the sake of others.

Thank you for a day set apart, not just for celebration, but also for solemn remembrance as we consider the sacrifices of so many in our military.

O Lord, may we be more aware of just how blessed we are as a nation. May we be more grateful for our blessings, more faithful in stewarding them well, more eager to share them with others.

We pray today for the families and friends of those who have given their lives in service to our nation. May they be comforted in their sadness. May they be reassured that the sacrifice of their loved ones contributes to a worthy cause. May they be proud of those they have lost, entrusting their ultimate fate into your gracious hands.

US FlagsXXEven as we remember those who have given their lives in the past, we also think of those whose lives are on the line today. We think especially of the men and women who are serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, and in other places of conflict and violence. Protect them. Encourage them. Bring them home safely . . . and soon.

Give wisdom to the leaders of our armed services, that they might know how best to deploy the troops in the cause of freedom. May their efforts be successful, so that true peace with justice might be established in our world.

Guide those who lead our nation in international affairs. Help them to pursue diplomatic paths that prevent needless conflict. May they have your wisdom about when and how to use the military might you have entrusted to us.

God of peace, stir in the hearts of the leaders of all nations, and in all who would use violence to further their cause. Change their hearts and minds. Give them a passion for peace. Bring an end to the pain, suffering, injustice, and violence in our world.

We know, dear Lord, that ultimate peace will not come until your kingdom is here in all of its fullness. Nevertheless, we pray for a foretaste of the future. We ask for the growth of peace throughout our world today, so that fewer and fewer men and women will have to risk and even to sacrifice their lives. May your kingdom come, Lord, and your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven!

All praise be to you, God of grace, God of mercy, God of justice, God of peace!

Amen