Archive | Events RSS feed for this section

“Lean On Me”

Lexington Medical Center invites you to view our hospital’s new music video, “Lean On Me.” Featuring hundreds of community leaders, law enforcement officers, families and hospital employees, it celebrates all that makes the Midlands special, while highlighting the kindness and generosity of community members with a beautiful arrangement of the famous song “Lean On Me.”

“A community is more than just a place. It’s a group of people who achieve great things with unity and purpose,” said Lexington Medical Center Vice President of Marketing & Communications Mark Shelley, who directed the music video. “At Lexington Medical Center, we celebrate the compassion found in our community every day. We believe we all need someone to lean on.”

leanonlexmed1

Filmed at River Bluff High School, the video stars Jonathan Wyndham, a Lexington County native who impressed judges on NBC’s The Voice last fall. Midlands residents performing with Wyndham include local singing sensation Cayla Fralick, River Bluff High School senior Bri Benedict, who is the daughter of Lexington Medical Center hospitalist Dr. James Benedict, and the Brookland Baptist Church young adult choir.

leanonlexmed2

Jonathan Wyndham, a 23-year-old Lexington High School graduate, currently lives in Nashville as a full-time musician. He attended Middle Tennessee State University where he studied commercial song writing, music business and entrepreneurship. He’s been singing since he was 3 years old.

After viewing “Lean On Me,” please share it with your friends and family on social media. Let’s show the world the power of community at Lexington Medical Center.

Filming Our Music Video

Lights! Camera! Action! Hundreds of people packed the River Bluff High School auditorium on March 26 to film Lexington Medical Center’s new music video. Lexington native Jonathan Wyndham of NBC’s The Voice, the Brookland Baptist Church Young Adult Choir, and local singing sensations Bri Benedict and Cayla Fralick sang the lead parts of the famous song “Lean On Me” while a cast of hundreds of community members joined in for the chorus. The video will debut one week from today on April 10! We can’t wait to show it to you. Until then, here are a few photos from the filming.

#LeanOnLexMed

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Register for the Colon Cancer Challenge Bike Ride

Lexington Medical Center will host its sixth annual Colon Cancer Challenge bike ride on Saturday, April 18, 2015. The one-day bicycling event will feature 65-, 50-, 25- and 15- and 5-mile rides that begin and end at Dutch Fork Middle School in Irmo. Hundreds of people participate in the event each year. All proceeds will go to the Lexington Medical Center Colon Cancer Fund, which provides screening colonoscopies for people who are uninsured or underserved.

bike ride“Lexington Medical Center is pleased that the Colon Cancer Challenge has provided dozens of important screening colonoscopies for people in need in our community,” said Barbara Willm, vice president of Community Relations at Lexington Medical Center. “The bike ride is also a fun event for the whole family that support a healthy lifestyle.”

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Each year, more than 2,000 South Carolinians are diagnosed with colon cancer and 800 die from the disease. But it’s also one of the most preventable forms of cancer – and treatable when detected early. Unfortunately, not everyone receives proper screening.

Registration begins at 7:00 a.m. The 65- and 50-mile rides begin at 8:00 a.m; the 25-mile ride at 8:30 a.m; the15-mile ride at 9:30 a.m; and the 5-mile ride at 10:00 a.m. Lunch for bike riders will be served at 11:00 a.m.

60-, 50-, 25- and 15-mile Bike Rides: Early Registration: $35. After April 14: $40. Day of Event: $45. 5-mile Bike Ride: Early Registration: $20. After April 14: $25. Day of Event: $30.

Learn more and register at www.LMCColonCancerChallenge.com.

bicylistHere are some colon cancer facts from the American College of Gastroenterology:
·Colon cancer is the only form of cancer that is preventable.
·The best way to screen for colon cancer is a colonoscopy, which is an examination of the large intestine using a lighted tube.
·Colonnoscopy is among the most powerful tools in clinical medicine, because of its excellent potential to identify and permit removal of polyps before they turn into cancer.
·In general, doctors recommend that people undergo a colonoscopy every 10 years beginning at age 50. African-Americans should begin screening at age 45.
·Early detection and intervention can reduce mortality from colon cancer by up to 90%.