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Preventing Cancer With A Healthy Diet

by Morgan Robbins, RD, LD at LMC

Research suggests that one-third of all cancers are preventable. Through diet, exercise and lifestyle changes you can protect yourself from developing cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) suggests nine ways to reduce your risk for cancer:

belly1. Maintain a healthy weight- Visit the Centers for Disease Control’s Healthy Weight Assessment to see what weight category you fall under. Keep in mind BMI is not a suitable indicator for all populations.

2. MOVE- Participate in some type of physical activity at least 30 minutes daily. Try parking at the opposite end of the parking lot, or squeeze in a walk on your lunch break.

3. Choose less calorie-dense foods- Low calorie-dense foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, contain little added fats and sugar.

4. Follow a plant-based diet- Plant based diets can help lower your risk for cancer; focus on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and legumes.

wine glass15. Eat less red and processed meats- Aim for less than 18 ounces of cooked red/processed meats such as bologna, hot dogs, bacon, sausage and deli meats per week.

6. Cut down on alcohol- One drink per day for women, two drinks per day for men and no- you cannot save all of your drinks for the weekend.

7. Eat less salt- Limit processed foods and foods that contain excess salt, get rid of the salt shaker and replace it with fresh herbs and spices.

8. Don’t rely on dietary supplements- Chose a diet rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants rather than relying on vitamins and supplements.

breastfeeding_29. Breastfeed your baby if possible- Breastfeeding can help protect Mom from cancer while baby reaps all the benefits.

Are You Getting Enough?

Are You Getting Enough?
By: Morgan Robbins RD, LD at LMC

September is fruit and vegetable month and what better time to re-evaluate your diet to ensure you’re getting enough fruits and vegetables. Ninety percent of adults and children do not meet their daily recommended fruit and vegetable intake.

Vegetables

Adults need 1-3 cups of fruits per day and 1½ -4 cups of vegetables per day. Everyone has different requirements, to find out what you need daily, visit the Fruit and Vegetable Calculator. When in doubt, fill up half of your plate with a combination of fruits and veggies!

fruit_4
Five Reasons to Add More Fruits and Vegetables to Your Diet:
5. Quick and easy snacks- Fruits and veggies serve as easy, portable and healthy snacks for all to enjoy.
4. Reduce risk for disease- Adequate intake can lower risk for chronic disease and other health aliments.
3. Fiber- Fruits and veggies are full of fiber which helps you feel full and keeps your digestive system in check.
2. Variety- Fruits and vegetables come in an endless amount of shapes, textures, flavors and colors, leaving you with plenty of options.
1. Vitamins and Minerals- Fruits and veggies are loaded with vitamins and minerals to keep your body energized and healthy.

“D2 & Me:” A Diabetes Support and Wellness Group

Lexington Medical Center has begun to host a new diabetes support and wellness group called “D2 & Me” for type 2 diabetes patients and their caregivers. The meetings, which are open to the public, will feature guest speakers, exercises, healthy cooking demonstrations and tastings, recipe exchanges and dinners at local restaurants.
doctor and patient13
Classes take place on the Lexington Medical Center hospital campus, the hospital’s community medical center in Lexington, and off site for special events. Clinicians and experts who have special training in caring for people who have diabetes lead the classes and meetings.

Here is the calendar of meetings for 2014:

Wednesday, September 17 – Meal Planning (includes carb counting)
Laura Stepp, MA, RD/LD, CDE
Lexington Medical Center Lexington
811 West Main Street, Lexington
First floor conference room
5:45 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.
Free and open to public

Wednesday, October 15 – Meal Planning – Part 2
Laura Stepp, MA, RD/LD, CDE
Lexington Medical Center Lexington
811 West Main Street, Lexington
First floor conference room
5:45 p.m. – 6:45 p.m.
Free and open to public

Thursday, November 13 – Holiday Recipe Makeovers
6:30pm – 8:30 pm
Lere Robinson
Columbia’s Cooking
915 Greene Street, Suite 200
Columbia
colacook@mailbox.sc.edu
803-576-5636
$35/class or $25/students/military/senior
Attendees must sign up online or call to register

December 9 & 17 – Diabetic-Friendly Holidays
Laura Stepp, MA, RD/LD, CDE
December 9th class will be in the Lexington Medical Center hospital campus inside Lower Level Classroom 3 from 5:45 – 6:45 p.m.
December 17th class will be at Lexington Medical Center’s community medical center at 811 West Main Street in Lexington inside the first floor conference room from 5:45 – 6:45 p.m.
Free and open to public

diabetes1LMC employee Natalie Copeland started the group in June. It was something she wanted to do after she was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

“Diabetes, regardless of type, is a prevalent disease nationwide that affects more than 29 million Americans. I figured there were a lot a people in this area affected by this disease, especially since obesity plays a big part in type 2 diabetes and obesity is a Lexington County community need that wasn’t being addressed,” Copeland said. “I am fortunate that I have been able to control my diabetes with diet and exercise. I want us to be able to control our diabetes so that it doesn’t control us.”

Since June, D2 & Me has provided people with type 2 diabetes a forum to talk about their disease and learn how to care for themselves. For more information on upcoming meetings, visit Facebook.com/D2andMe or www.LexMed.com.