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Breakfast Perspective

by Morgan Robbins, RD, LD at LMC

Breakfast has been under ridicule lately that it may not be the most important meal of the day. Let’s get back to the basics: think of your body as being in a fasting state while you’re sleeping until the moment that you wake up (breaking the fast = breakfast, clever right?).

banana_2Eating an early meal soon after waking up will jump-start your metabolism and get your body ready for the day. Remember, FOOD is fuel; it’s what helps you get through the day. You get out what you put in, if you don’t put fuel in the tank or put poor quality fuel in, you’re not going to go very far (example: you skip breakfast or eat foods lacking in quality nutrition more than likely you’re going to be starving by lunch time and make poor choices). This will help put the meals and foods you choose into a new perspective.

breakfast9What to eat always seems to be the question. Too many people are choosing high fat, high cholesterol, high sodium breakfasts that are lacking the nutrition needed to give your body the energy it requires. I’m talking bacon, sausage, biscuits with gravy, chicken nuggets and hash. These are all foods to be consumed in moderation and preferably not as the meal you chose to give your body the fuel it needs to start your day.

Let’s compare a healthy breakfast with a not-so-healthy breakfast:

Whole wheat toast w/ 1 Tbsp peanut butter
½ cup blueberries
1 banana
Greek yogurt

411 calories
27 gm protein
8 gm fiber
22% calories from fat
3 mg cholesterol
287 mg sodium

Sausage biscuit
Grits

618 calories
14 gm protein
2 gm fiber
54% calories from fat
33 mg cholesterol
1,373 mg sodium

In addition to being the better choice, you’re getting whole grains, healthy fats and more vitamins and minerals with the healthy breakfast compared to the not so healthy breakfast. You’re also getting more food with the healthy breakfast – so enjoy!

When doing so in moderation, you can make all foods fit into a healthy diet. Moderation is the key. When planning or ordering your breakfast tomorrow, keep in mind this is the fuel your body will use to start your day off right!

Preventing Cancer With A Healthy Diet

by Morgan Robbins, RD, LD at LMC

Research suggests that one-third of all cancers are preventable. Through diet, exercise and lifestyle changes you can protect yourself from developing cancer. The American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) suggests nine ways to reduce your risk for cancer:

belly1. Maintain a healthy weight- Visit the Centers for Disease Control’s Healthy Weight Assessment to see what weight category you fall under. Keep in mind BMI is not a suitable indicator for all populations.

2. MOVE- Participate in some type of physical activity at least 30 minutes daily. Try parking at the opposite end of the parking lot, or squeeze in a walk on your lunch break.

3. Choose less calorie-dense foods- Low calorie-dense foods, such as fruits, vegetables and whole grains, contain little added fats and sugar.

4. Follow a plant-based diet- Plant based diets can help lower your risk for cancer; focus on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans and legumes.

wine glass15. Eat less red and processed meats- Aim for less than 18 ounces of cooked red/processed meats such as bologna, hot dogs, bacon, sausage and deli meats per week.

6. Cut down on alcohol- One drink per day for women, two drinks per day for men and no- you cannot save all of your drinks for the weekend.

7. Eat less salt- Limit processed foods and foods that contain excess salt, get rid of the salt shaker and replace it with fresh herbs and spices.

8. Don’t rely on dietary supplements- Chose a diet rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants rather than relying on vitamins and supplements.

breastfeeding_29. Breastfeed your baby if possible- Breastfeeding can help protect Mom from cancer while baby reaps all the benefits.

Are You Getting Enough?

Are You Getting Enough?
By: Morgan Robbins RD, LD at LMC

September is fruit and vegetable month and what better time to re-evaluate your diet to ensure you’re getting enough fruits and vegetables. Ninety percent of adults and children do not meet their daily recommended fruit and vegetable intake.

Vegetables

Adults need 1-3 cups of fruits per day and 1½ -4 cups of vegetables per day. Everyone has different requirements, to find out what you need daily, visit the Fruit and Vegetable Calculator. When in doubt, fill up half of your plate with a combination of fruits and veggies!

fruit_4
Five Reasons to Add More Fruits and Vegetables to Your Diet:
5. Quick and easy snacks- Fruits and veggies serve as easy, portable and healthy snacks for all to enjoy.
4. Reduce risk for disease- Adequate intake can lower risk for chronic disease and other health aliments.
3. Fiber- Fruits and veggies are full of fiber which helps you feel full and keeps your digestive system in check.
2. Variety- Fruits and vegetables come in an endless amount of shapes, textures, flavors and colors, leaving you with plenty of options.
1. Vitamins and Minerals- Fruits and veggies are loaded with vitamins and minerals to keep your body energized and healthy.