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LMC Wins a Telly Award for Heart Attack Commercial


Lexington Medical Center has received a prestigious Silver Telly Award for its heart attack commercial titled “I Am A Heart Attack.”  The Telly Awards honor outstanding local, regional and cable TV commercials and programs.  With nearly 11,000 entries from all 50 states and numerous countries, winners represent the best campaigns from around the world. The Silver Telly is the organization’s highest honor, representing less than 10 percent of entries.

The commercial details the cause and effect of heart disease. A man walking in the night plays the role of a heart attack. He discusses risk factors including high blood pressure, lifestyle, cholesterol, and ignoring warning signs.

The concept was inspired by public service announcements but Lexington Medical Center aimed to make a greater impact with a message about heart disease, a condition that causes 9,000 fatalities a year in South Carolina. Shot in one night with a five-man crew in eight different locations, the message is realistic and clear; a heart attack can sneak up on you.

“We wanted to grab the viewer’s attention with more than the usual ‘eat right and exercise’ message,” said David Anderson, co-writer and broadcast producer in Lexington Medical Center’s Marketing Department. “The fact that we filmed through the night gave the commercial an edge and it worked with our message.”

A prestigious judging panel of more than 500 accomplished industry professionals, each a past winner of a Silver Telly and a member of the Silver Telly Council, judged the competition, upholding the historical standard of excellence that Telly represents. The Silver Telly Council evaluated entries to recognize distinction in creative work.

“The Telly Awards’ mission is to honor the very best in film and video,” said Linda Day, executive director of the Telly Awards. Lexington Medical Center’s accomplishment illustrates their creativity, skill, and dedication to their craft and serves as a testament to great film and video production.”

The commercial was part of the hospital’s Midlands Goes Red campaign in which Lexington Medical Center challenged the entire community to promote heart healthy living.  Cardiovascular disease is an epidemic in South Carolina. One out of every 3 deaths in our state is related to cardiovascular disease. According to the American Heart Association, life expectancy in the United States would rise by 7 years if all forms of major cardiovascular disease were eliminated.

Lexington Medical Center started a complete cardiac care program in 2012 and has completed over 200 open heart surgeries. The ability to provide comprehensive cardiovascular care, including open heart surgery and therapeutic cardiac catheterizations, helps Lexington Medical Center meet its mission of providing quality health services that meet the needs of our community and enhances the delivery of health care to the Midlands.

The work in Lexington Medical Center’s cardiac care program extends into the community with a robust heart education program and a strong resource for people who want to be involved. Lexington Medical Center’s heart program is affiliated with Duke Medicine, home to one of the best heart surgery programs in the country.

LMC Earns National Stroke Award from American Heart Association and American Stroke Association

As we continue to recognize Stroke Awareness throughout the month of May, LMC is proud to receive a prestigious award for stroke care.  The award demonstrates commitment to quality care for stroke patients. 

Image via Visual.ly

Image via Visual.ly

 

For the third time, Lexington Medical Center has received a Gold Plus Quality Achievement award for stroke care from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke program. The Gold Plus award is the highest honor bestowed and recognizes commitment and success in implementing excellent care for stroke patients.

“Lexington Medical Center is proud to receive this award as it demonstrates our commitment to being one of the top hospitals in the country for providing effective, evidence-based stroke care,” said Vicky Hicks, RN, B-C, outcomes coordinator at Lexington Medical Center.

The honor goes to hospitals with excellent adherence to stroke quality indicators and measures, including aggressive use of proven medications, therapy, cholesterol reducing drugs and smoking cessation, all aimed at reducing death and disability, and improving the lives of stroke patients.

“Recent studies show that patients treated in hospitals participating in the American Heart Association’s “Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke” program receive a higher quality of care and may experience better outcomes,” said Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., chair of the Get With The Guidelines National Steering Committee and director of the TeleStroke and Acute Stroke Services at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. “Lexington Medical Center’s team is to be commended for their commitment to improving the care of their patients.”

“Get With The Guidelines®–Stroke” helps Lexington Medical Center develop and implement acute and secondary prevention guideline processes to improve patient care and outcomes. The program provides hospitals with a web-based patient management tool, best practice discharge protocols and standing orders, along with a robust registry and real-time benchmarking capabilities to track performance.

Lexington Medical Center is certified by Det Norske Veritas Healthcare, Inc. as a Primary Stroke Center in the Midlands. The Certification Program for Primary Stroke Centers recognizes organizations that follow the best practices for stroke care. Achieving Primary Stroke Center Certification indicates the hospital’s dedication to cultivating better outcomes for patients.

According to the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, stroke is one of the leading causes of death and serious, long-term disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel carrying oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts. When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs and begins to die. Warning signs include weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, facial drooping, confusion and the inability to talk.  Risk factors for stroke are untreated high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and high cholesterol. Stroke is an emergency. Call 911 at the first sign of stroke. Modifying your lifestyle can help prevent stroke.

A few LMC employees that were an integral part of obtaining the award.

A few LMC employees that were an integral part of obtaining the award.


From left to right: Christine Scott, MD/Medical Director Stroke Center, Tammy Fenske, RN,BC Care Manager, Melanie Lake, Frank Pussey, MD, Francis Glover, NM, Stroke Unit, Betsy Cromer, RN, Sean Valdepenas, PT, Kelly Nyberg RDLD, Vicky Hicks, RN,BC, Outcomes Coordinator, Shannon Turner, RN, and Kathy West, RT(R). 

Lexington Medical Center Receives Award for Outstanding Heart Attack Care

imageLexington Medical Center has received an award from the American Heart Association for outstanding care of patients with the most dangerous type of heart attack, known as a STEMI. The American Heart Association has awarded Lexington Medical Center with its “Mission: Lifeline®” Silver Level Recognition Award for its efforts to improve the quality of care for STEMI patients.
“Lexington Medical Center is the only hospital in the Midlands to meet ‘Mission: Lifeline®’ recognition,” said Kristin Davis, director of “Mission: Lifeline” South Carolina. “The staff should be very proud of all the hard work they have put into the hospital system.”

STEMI is an acronym for “ST segment elevation myocardial infarction.” During a STEMI, a coronary artery is completely blocked off and nearly all of the heart muscle supplied by the artery starts to die. This type of heart attack is usually recognized by the changes it produces on an electrocardiogram (ECG).

According to the American Heart Association, nearly 250,000 Americans experience a STEMI each year. The majority of these patients fail to receive appropriate treatment for their life-threatening conditions within recommended timeframes.

The American Heart Association created “Mission: Lifeline®” to provide education about prompt and appropriate STEMI treatment. The Recognition Awards honor hospitals that treat STEMI patients with recommended door-to-device timeframes, and follow up with appropriate medication, treatment and education. The awards also measure the work of EMS and referral centers.

“This award reflects our dedication to heart attack care in all phases of the care continuum at our hospital” said James W. Jeffcoat, MSN, RN-BC, Lexington Medical Center Outcomes Coordinator.
Lexington Medical Heart Center offers comprehensive cardiovascular care, including open heart surgery and therapeutic catheterizations. It is the only Duke Heart Center affiliated program in the Midlands.
The hospital began its complete cardiac care program in 2012. In its first year, Lexington Medical Center performed nearly 200 open heart surgeries. This year, Lexington Medical Center has added a second open heart surgeon. In addition, Lexington Medical Center now offers electrophysiology, a cardiology specialty that focuses on the treatment of abnormal heart rhythms. The hospital is also looking toward providing minimally invasive aortic valve replacement in the future.