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Treating Stroke

Dr. Christopher McCarty, radiologist with Lexington Radiology Associates at Lexington Medical Center, was a guest on WLTX this month to talk about stroke in South Carolina. In the segment below, he talks abut prevalence, signs, symptoms and treatment.

Here are some notes from the doctor:

~A stroke is a medical emergency marked by a sudden change in neurological function caused by the blockage of blood flow leading to the brain.

~Major risk factors include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes, smoking and an irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation.

~South Carolina has a high rate of stroke. It’s the 4th leading cause of death in our state.

~Signs that someone is suffering a stroke include face asymmetry or drooping of the face, arm weakness or numbness and slurred speech. These symptoms require timely treatment in order to preserve brain function.

~Doctors can give a drug called TPA that is a clot busting medicine if timely treatment is received.

Oh, Baby! Understanding Sleep Schedules and Vaccines

Dr. Jeremy Crisp of Lexington Family Practice Northeast, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, was a guest on WLTX this week to talk about common questions parents have about their young children. During their morning newscast, he answered questions from news anchor Ashley Izbicki about several topics.

In this segment, he offers tips for establishing a sleep schedule with an infant.

In this segment, he talks about the importance of vaccines and they dangerous diseases they can prevent.

Ask the Doctor: Coronary Bypass Surgery

Dr. Dee Prastein, heart surgeon at Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery, was invited to be a guest on WIS-TV to talk about coronary bypass surgery. The topic was in the news after Bob Coble, the former mayor of Columbia, suffered a heart attack and underwent a bypass procedure.

In the first segment, she talked about how bypass surgery is performed.

In the second segment, she discussed recovery.

Lexington Medical Heart Center has performed more than 800 open heart surgeries since the program began in 2012. For more information, visit