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Breast Cancer: Understanding the Latest Diagnostics and Treatments

Join Lexington Medical Center and Dr. Ronald G. Myatich from Southern Surgical Group on Monday, October 27 at 6:00 p.m. for a free Physician Lecture Series at Lexington Medical Center in West Columbia, SC.

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Breast Cancer: Understanding the Latest Diagnostics and Treatment

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to present its monthly physician lecture on Monday, October 27 at 6:00 p.m. inside the Lexington Medical Park 1 Auditorium on the hospital campus. This month’s topic is “Breast Cancer: Understanding the Latest Diagnostics and Treatment.” Ronald G. Myatich, MD, FACS, of Southern Surgical Group at Lexington Medical Center will give the presentation. It’s free and open to the public. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and light refreshments will be served.

Myatich_RonaldDuring the lecture, Dr. Myatich will discuss the history of breast cancer treatment, current screening and treatment options, and the future of breast cancer treatment.

breast x-rayStatistics show that one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime. Lexington Medical Center diagnoses approximately 250 breast cancer patients each year. The hospital’s breast program has accreditation from the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) and the American College of Radiology (ACR). Lexington Medical Center has four Women’s Imaging centers and a mobile mammography van, all offering digital mammography. Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program also has accreditation with commendation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to present a monthly lecture series featuring physicians speaking out medical topics that are important to our community. For the calendar of future events, visit LexMed.com.

The Flu Vaccine: Who Will You Do It For?

This time of year, it’s important to receive a flu vaccine. By becoming vaccinated, you protect yourself from getting sick and passing influenza to patients, co-workers, family members and others.

LMC is launching a flu vaccine campaign. Personalize a sign with the name of the person or persons for whom you get the flu vaccine. Then, ask someone to take a photo of you and your sign with a cell phone and post these pictures to Facebook or Instagram, or text the photo to your loved ones. Use hashtags #NotJustForYou! and #FluVaccine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that anyone 6 months of age and older should be vaccinated annually as the first and most important step in protecting against this serious disease. Vaccination is especially important for health care workers and those who live with or care for people at high risk of flu complications, such as children younger than 2 years, adults older than 65 years and pregnant women.

Sometimes, people can be skeptical of the flu vaccine. In this news video from WIS-TV, LMC doctor Jeremy Crisp of Lexington Family Practice Northeast talks about that.

Meanwhile, take everyday preventive steps to reduce the spread of germs:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
• Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink fluids and eat healthy foods.
• Cough into your sleeve instead of your hands if you do not have a tissue.
• If you have flu-like symptoms, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone without taking fever-reducing medicine.
• While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible.