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It’s Not Easy Being “Green”


by: Sarah McClanahan

According to Hospitals for a Healthy Environment, an estimated 6,600 tons of waste are generated each day in U.S. hospitals and almost 85% of that waste is considered non-hazardous such as paper, cardboard and plastic containers. These facts are what led Lexington Medical Center to create programs and initiatives to reduce its carbon footprint in the community. In 1993, Lexington Medical Center started a hospital-wide recycling program, which began on Earth Day that year. The hospital recycled approximately 100,000 pounds of cardboard, paper, newspapers, glass bottles and tin cans during the first year. Last year, Lexington Medical Center recycled more than 885,000 pounds of municipal waste at its main campus – about 30% of its total waste.

Lexington Medical Center has become synonymous with quality “Green” initiatives. The hospital was first recognized in 2003 by the Business Recycling Assistance Program and received its “Best Industry Recycling Program.” Other awards have included Paper Recycler of the Year, Outstanding Air Quality Business of the Year, Best Overall Environmental Program and South Carolina Smart Business Recycling Award. Most recently, the hospital became a Lexington County Green Certified Business.

“We’re proud of the staff that is helping Lexington Medical Center make such impressive progress with our environmental initiatives,” said Mike Greeley, vice president of operations at Lexington Medical Center. “As one of the largest organizations in Lexington County, we feel it is our obligation to set the right example when it comes to environmental stewardship.”

In addition to its recycling programs, Lexington Medical Center built the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified medical office building in 2008. This designation comes from the U.S. Green Building Council, which sets the standards for sustainable site development, energy efficiency, conservation of materials and resources and indoor environment quality. The “green” medical office building has several important eco-friendly characteristics such recycled construction materials, energy-efficient roofing and windows, and improved building insulation.

This month, Lexington Medical Center celebrates its 40th anniversary. We opened as a small county hospital on January 6, 1971. Today, we’ve grown into a modern medical complex with state-of-the-art technology and an unsurpassed culture of caring. Each day this month, we’ll share a story from our hospital’s history book.

Thank You, Danny Hugueley

We are paying tribute to Lexington Medical Center employees who have worked at the hospital for 40 years.

Danny will celebrate his 40th anniversary at Lexington Medical Center in May. He started working in the Emergency Room in 1971 and moved to Information Services in 1973. Throughout his 40 years at the hospital, Danny has noticed the most significant changes in technology. “The first hospital mainframe computer I worked on had 12,000 bytes of memory. The personal computer on my desk has 2 billion. There was also one computer for the entire hospital. You would be amazed at the technology advances in the computer industry and the way we do things at the hospital today.” Danny has continued to work at Lexington Medical Center because he believes that the hospital truly does care about its employees. A resident of Lexington County, he and his wife have two daughters and three grandchildren.

This month, Lexington Medical Center celebrates its 40th anniversary. We opened as a small county hospital on January 6, 1971. Today, we’ve grown into a modern medical complex with state-of-the-art technology and an unsurpassed culture of caring. Each day this month, we’ll share a story from our hospital’s history book.

A Leader in Women’s Services

Since it opened, Lexington Medical Center has built an impressive lists of “firsts” in women’s services:

-First hospital in the Midlands to allow Lamaze-trained husbands in the delivery room
-First breast center in Columbia accredited by the American College of Radiology
-First Midlands hospital to offer epidural anesthesia
-First area hospital to offer doula assistance during childbirth
-First hospital to introduce Kangaroo Care for premature babies

In 1984, Lexington Medical Center opened Women’s Hospital, which combined family centered maternity care, new facilities and comprehensive education courses that covered childbirth preparation, infant care and fitness during pregnancy. The Women’s Hospital also encompassed a variety of programs such as Kangaroo Care where parents are able to nestle skin-to-skin with their premature newborn, giving the tiniest newborns a way to bond with their parents.

A Lexington Medical Center Doula helps a patient in labor


Another example is the innovative Doula program in which professionally-trained doulas provide comfort and reassurance to women in labor. This program is the first-of-its-kind in the Southeast and serves as a worldwide benchmark.

“Our Women’s Services division provides holistic, high touch, compassionate care to women and their families. Women who experience childbirth at Lexington Medical Center select our facility because of the care they receive and the many options we provide. This truly differentiates us from others in the Columbia area,” said Nydia Harter, director of Nursing for Women and Children Services.

Continuing its commitment beyond childbirth, Lexington Medical Center opened the Women’s Imaging Center in 1985. This center provides state-of-the-art diagnosis and care in all areas of mammography and breast ultrasound including screening and digital mammography, stereotactic and ultrasound biopsy, breast MRI and MRI biopsy, and bone densitometry.


Four Women’s Imaging Center facilities and a mobile unit offer digital mammography, which can detect spots as small as a single grain of sand. It was the first breast center in the Midlands accredited by the American College of Radiology and the only Midlands hospital with Five Day Detection to Diagnosis for breast cancer. Under this program, patients are seen within 24 hours of detecting a lump and receive a definitive answer about the health of their breast within five days of detection.

This month, Lexington Medical Center celebrates its 40th anniversary. We opened as a small county hospital on January 6, 1971. Today, we’ve grown into a modern medical complex with state-of-the-art technology and an unsurpassed culture of caring. Each day this month, we’ll share a story from our hospital’s history book.