Archive | January, 2019

The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide

According to the American Red Cross, more than 15,200 people go to hospital emergency rooms each year to be treated for carbon monoxide poisoning.

And, approximately 400 people die each year from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Sadly, two people in Columbia died from carbon monoxide poisoning in their apartment complex this month.

In this WIS-TV interview with news anchor Judi Gatson, Dr. Alex Kranc of Lexington Medical Center’s Emergency department talks about what carbon monoxide is and how to recognize the signs of poisoning.

Carbon monoxide can build up to lethal levels in just a few days. Victims may complain of feeling like they have the flu or feeling faint after exposure. They can also have headaches or dizziness. Ultimately, high concentrations of carbon monoxide can starve the heart and brain of oxygen.

carbon monoxide detector

Carbon monoxide can be found in a closed garage with a car running, gas appliances in the kitchen, basements with improperly installed furnaces, hot water heaters or dryers, and gas or solid fuel stoves in living rooms.

Adequate ventilation in cold weather and using caution with heat sources can prevent the buildup of carbon monoxide gas and help reduce fire hazards.

It’s also important to have a carbon monoxide detector in your home. However, the American Red Cross reports that only one in 10 homes has one.

Support Groups for Breast Cancer Patients

Lexington Medical Center offers a number of support groups for patients with cancer. Meeting with fellow cancer patients and families can help alleviate stress and depression, and educate families about their cancer journey. The support groups are also free for anyone to attend, even if they did not receive their cancer treatment at Lexington Medical Center.

The first group is called “Coping with Cancer Together.” It’s for anyone diagnosed with cancer and meets at the hospital on Wednesday mornings.

The second group is “Sharing Hope.” It’s for women with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. With the group run by a Lexington Medical Center breast cancer nurse navigator, patients gather and draw support from others.

This month, WLTX came to a Sharing Hope meeting to learn more about how the group helps patients. Here is the story.

To learn more about “Coping with Cancer Together” and “Sharing Hope,” click here.

Lexington Medical Center offers other support groups, too. To learn more about them, click here.