Archive | October, 2017

Simply “The Best”

The votes are in!

Readers of The State newspaper selected Lexington Medical Center as “Best Hospital Facility,” “Best Place to Have a Baby” and “Best Urgent Care” in the Midlands in the annual readers’ choice poll.

Anchored by a 428-bed hospital in West Columbia, Lexington Medical Center’s network of care includes seven community medical centers, the largest skilled nursing facility in the Carolinas and approximately 60 physician practices. Lexington Medical Center delivers more babies than any other hospital in the Midlands and has Urgent Care facilities located throughout Lexington County.

Dr. Allyson Jones of Carolina Women’s Physicians

They also selected Allyson I. Jones, MD, FACOG, at Carolina Women’s Physicians as “Best Obstetrician.”

By performing the most advanced procedures, offering state-of-the-art technologies and delivering compassionate care, Lexington Medical Center consistently demonstrates its commitment to providing quality health services that meet the needs of the community.

Thank you for voting for us!

Campaign for Clarity Tip-Off

Join the Lexington Medical Center Foundation, University of South Carolina men’s head basketball coach Frank Martin, Cocky, USC cheerleaders, the Carolina Girls and Gamecock fans for the “Campaign for Clarity Tip-Off” on Monday, November 6.

Proceeds from this event at the Colonial Life Arena will raise money for the Lexington Medical Center Foundation’s “Campaign for Clarity,” a capital campaign to provide 3-D mammography throughout Lexington Medical Center’s network of care.

Beginning at 6:30 p.m., the event includes a question and answer session with Coach Martin, hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Tickets are $75 per person and can be purchased at LexMed.com/tipoff.

Frank Martin became the head coach of the University of South Carolina men’s basketball team in 2012. He coached the team to the school’s first-ever appearance in the Final Four in the 2017 NCAA tournament.

As a leader in cancer care in the Midlands, Lexington Medical Center has a goal of expanding its 3-D mammography program throughout the hospital’s network of care. It currently provides 3-D mammogram technology at some of its Women’s Imaging locations and physician practices.

Producing multiple images of breast tissue within seconds, studies have shown that 3-D mammography increases breast cancer detection and reduces false positives. Women who would like to schedule a 3-D mammogram at Lexington Medical Center should call (803) 791 – 2486.

For more information on the Lexington Medical Center Foundation, visit LMCFoundation.com.

Campaign for Clarity Tip-Off
Monday, November 6, 2017
6:30 p.m.
Colonial Life Arena
$75 per person
LexMed.com/tipoff

Keeping Your Back on Track at Work

Lifting heavy objects.
Overusing the same muscle.
Carrying children and groceries.
Sitting at a desk with poor posture.

These are some of the things that put our backs to the test every day. Janie C. “Kaki” Bruce, MD, and and Bruce Goeckeritz, MD, FACR, CCD, are rheumatologists with Lexington Rheumatology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. As doctors treating joint and soft tissue diseases, they have great advice for keeping your back on track in the workplace.

“Sitting at a desk all day can cause neck, shoulder and upper back pain,” Dr. Goeckeritz said. “There can be chronic strain on your muscles from poor posture while spending hours in front of a computer screen using a keyboard and mouse. It’s the same kind of pain that comes form overworking muscles during a weekend project around the house.”

Some patients also experience a headache in the back of the head that gets worse as the day progresses, or pain that spreads and feels like pins and needles.

“For most of us, sitting for prolonged periods is part of our daily routine,” said Dr. Bruce. In fact, studies show that American workers spend nearly six hours of each work day sitting at a desk. “Poor posture or sitting in chairs that are not ergonomically correct can also exacerbate lower back pain.”

Options including ergonomically correct chairs and standing desks can help. A rheumatologist can also proscribe injections, physical therapy, dry needling and muscle relaxers.

Lexington Rheumatology. Clockwise from top left: Bruce Goeckeritz, MD, FACR, CCD; Fernando X. Castro, MD; Janie C. “Kaki” Bruce, MD; Maria Farooq, MD; Frederick A. Talip, MD

“These treatments can help, but strengthening the muscles and preventing future strains are the keys to solving the problem permanently,” Dr. Goeckeritz said.

Back pain that continues for more than three months can be related to osteoarthritis in the back – also known as degenerative disc disease.

“This condition results form wear and tear between the disc spaces in the spine, causing narrowing and bone spur formation,” Dr. Bruce said. “Pain usually begins in patients over age 40 with a history of overuse or injury.”

Other types of arthritis can cause inflammation in the spine and other joints. These conditions usually include stiffness in the morning that improves during the day and with use.

Sometimes, back pain may indicate a more serious condition. Back pain that radiates into the legs, or occurs with a fever, weakness in the leg, or onset of incontinence warrants a trip to the doctor immediately.

Rheumatologists can help establish the cause of back pain, rule out concerning symptoms that need immediate attention, and recommend appropriate therapy.

Back Tips
~Sit upright, pull the computer keyboard toward you and raise the monitor so that you don’t slump your shoulders or lean your head and neck forward while looking at the screen.
~The top of your computer monitor should be at eye level.
~Your chair should have adjustable seat height, back and arm rests.
~Stretch your shoulders, neck and upper back frequently.
~Avoid sitting or holding a muscle group in the same position for hours.
~Outside of work, participate in exercise that focuses on strengthening the muscles of the neck and upper back.