Surviving Cardiac Arrest

Alan Courtney suffered cardiac arrest playing ultimate frisbee with his F3 group in Lexington. From the field to the ambulance to Lexington Medical Center, a highly-skilled chain of clinicians worked together to save his life. Alan received “The Phoenix Award” this year, which honors cardiac arrest survivors. Here’s his story.

 

“For a patient to survive cardiac arrest in the community, we need a high level of integration and coordination of care. The Phoenix Award allows us to showcase Lexington Medical Center’s valuable partnership with our first responders and Lexington County Public Safety,” said Brent M. Powers, MD, LMC’s chief medical officer. “It’s also a way to celebrate the stories of our cardiac arrest survivors and introduce them to the people who saved their lives.”

Lexington County Public Safety is the sole provider of 9-1-1 services in Lexington County. Covering 750 square miles, Lexington County 9-1-1, Fire Service and Emergency Medical Services work seamlessly as a team to provide for the emergency needs of citizens and visitors.

When cardiac arrest occurs, the heart cannot pump blood to the brain, lungs and other organs. Seconds later, a person becomes unresponsive, is not breathing or is gasping. Death can occur within minutes if the patient does not receive treatment. Cardiac arrest can be reversible in some victims if it’s treated within a few minutes. First, call 9-1-1 and start CPR right away. If an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) is available, use it as soon as possible.

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